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“Selling” Your California Medical Marijuana Collective

“Selling” Your California Medical Marijuana Collective

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Since passage of the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (“MCRSA“) and Proposition 64, one of the top questions our California marijuana lawyers have been getting from existing medical marijuana operators is “how can I sell my medical marijuana collective?” Of course, many collectives are not hard-pressed to find willing buyers. In the City of Los Angeles, for example, where only 135 Proposition D-compliant dispensary collectives are allowed to exist (which will also receive priority status from the City under the MCRSA and Prop. 64 in the event Measure M passes on March 7th), buyers are lining up to try to buy LA dispensaries that can get them into that market. There is also plenty of buyer interest in other California collectives that can demonstrate continuous operation and good standing with their local jurisdictions to qualify for “priority status” under both the MCRSA and Prop. 64.

But here’s the big issue: neither the MCRSA nor Prop. 64 repealed Proposition 215 and Senate Bill 420, which together make up California’s current and very vague medical marijuana laws. What this means is that all medical marijuana collectives must still operate as non-profit entities unless and until the application period opens for licenses under the MCRSA or Prop. 64. And just to further complicate matters, “collective” is an industry term of art; it is not a specific type of California legal entity and you are not going to find it in the California Corporations Code. One of the main reasons for California’s “collective model” is that the California Attorney General’s office issued a memo in 2008 with its interpretation of the medical marijuana laws that concluded those laws forbid the sale of medical marijuana for profit and, therefore, only “non-profit operation” would be allowed in the event qualified patients were to “collectively or cooperatively” cultivate and distribute medical cannabis to other qualified patients.

As a result of that 2008 memo, most qualified patients form nonprofit entities to handle their “commercial” medical marijuana activity. They typically form nonprofit mutual benefit corporations (“NPMBCs”) that they refer to as “collectives.” In turn, it isn’t possible to “buy” a collective. Why? Because there’s no equity or stock to purchase. Of course, there are other solutions to this non-profit conundrum, but they must be carefully considered and well thought out by both a prospective purchaser and the collective.

 

To Read The Rest Of This Article On Future Cannabis Project, Click Here

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